CCIE Pursuit Blog

August 19, 2008

Lab Tip: Entering Large Numbers

Filed under: Cisco,Cisco Certification,IOS,Lab Tips — cciepursuit @ 4:39 pm
Tags: , , , ,

In the lab (and in real life) you may need to enter values in bits per seconds.  This is especially prevalent in QoS tasks.  You want to be careful that you don’t configure everything correctly but lose points because you added or subtracted a zero from the value. 

In this example we are asked to police to 2.5Mbps.

r5(config-pmap-c)#police ?
  <8000-2000000000>  Bits per second
  cir                Committed information rate
  rate               Specify police rate

Converting 2.5Mbps to bps is easy.  If you’re extremely paranoid, you could open up the Windows calculator and multiply 2.5 by 1,000,000.  Either way you come up with 2,500,000 bits per second.

When entering this value into IOS I put spaces or commas to break up the string of digits.  That way it’s harder for me to add or miss a zero:

r5(config-pmap-c)#police 2 500 000

Or:

r5(config-pmap-c)#police 2,500,000

Then remove the spaces or commas.  That way you’re less likely to change your bits per second value by power of ten.

r5(config-pmap-c)#police 2500000

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2 Comments »

  1. nice tips … so many zero .. worried could mistype 🙂

    Comment by maher — August 19, 2008 @ 10:36 pm | Reply

  2. Cool tip, I never knew you could do this and it will help me no end. Now if you could come up with a way of making sure that I do not get my conversions between bits’ bytes and megabytes wrong as well as making sure that I do not misread what type of unit the interface requires then I would be most grateful 🙂

    Comment by Ferret999 — August 20, 2008 @ 3:14 am | Reply


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