CCIE Pursuit Blog

April 12, 2008

Internetwork Expert Volume III: Lab 5 – Section 4

Interior Gateway Routing – 25 Points

4.1 EIGRP

“Do not send multicast EIGRP updates within VLAN 14”

neighbor (EIGRP)

Remember that you need to configure this on both routers (unlike OSPF):

r1
router eigrp 10
 network 128.1.14.1 0.0.0.0
 no auto-summary
 eigrp router-id 150.1.1.1
 neighbor 128.1.14.4 FastEthernet0/0.2

r4
router eigrp 10
 network 128.1.14.4 0.0.0.0
 no auto-summary
 eigrp router-id 150.1.4.4
 neighbor 128.1.14.1 FastEthernet0/0

4.2 OSPF

Configure OSPF area 0.0.0.0.  This is just the dotted decimal equivalent of area 0.

r1(config-router)#do sh run | sec router os
router ospf 100
 router-id 150.1.1.1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 128.1.136.1 0.0.0.0 area 0.0.0.0

r1(config-router)#do sh ip os int br
Interface    PID   Area            IP Address/Mask    Cost  State Nbrs F/C
Fa0/0.1      100   0.0.0.0        128.1.136.1/24     1     WAIT  0/0

4.3 OSPF

“Without enabling OSPF on r3’s interface fa0/0.2 or r6’s interface fa0/0.2, ensure that they will still receive OSPF routers from each other in the event that they lose their connectivity with r1.”

Basically, we need to make sure that r3 and r6 can communicate over their redundant LAN connection if the primary one fails.

I’m thinking that we can tunnel over that second LAN.  The only problem is that you’d need to an a new subnet to do this.  I peeked the solution guide and that exactly what they did, so I guess that it’s alright.

r6(config-router)#do sh ip os int br
Interface    PID   Area            IP Address/Mask    Cost  State Nbrs F/C
Fa0/0.1      100   0.0.0.0         128.1.136.6/24     1     DROTH 2/2
Tu0          100   0.0.0.0         128.1.63.6/24      11111 P2P   1/1

Neighbor ID     Pri   State           Dead Time   Address         Interface
150.1.1.1         1   FULL/DR         00:00:31    128.1.136.1     FastEthernet0/0.1
150.1.3.3         1   FULL/BDR        00:00:32    128.1.136.3     FastEthernet0/0.1
150.1.3.3         0   FULL/  –        00:00:34    128.1.63.3      Tunnel0

r6(config)#int fa0/0.1
r6(config-subif)#shut
r6(config-subif)#do sh ip os nei

Neighbor ID     Pri   State           Dead Time   Address         Interface
150.1.3.3         0   FULL/  –        00:00:34    128.1.63.3      Tunnel0

4.4 OSPF

Configure OSPF on the PPPoFR network.

The current OPSF network type is point-to-point, which makes sense considering we’re running PPP.  🙂

r5(config-router)#do sh ip os int | i proto|Type
Virtual-Access2 is up, line protocol is up
  Process ID 100, Router ID 150.1.5.5, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 1
Virtual-Template1 is down, line protocol is down
  Process ID 100, Router ID 150.1.5.5, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 1
Virtual-Access1 is up, line protocol is up
  Process ID 100, Router ID 150.1.5.5, Network Type POINT_TO_POINT, Cost: 1

I’m going to need to change the network type because this is a hub-and-spoke network.  Let’s use point-to-multipoint:

r2(config)#int virtual-template 1
r2(config-if)#ip os net non-broadcast

After all is said and done:

r2#sh ip route os
     128.1.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 6 subnets, 2 masks
O IA    128.1.136.0/24 [110/3] via 128.1.125.5, 00:00:58, Virtual-Access1
O IA    128.1.63.0/24 [110/11114] via 128.1.125.5, 00:00:58, Virtual-Access1
O       128.1.125.1/32 [110/2] via 128.1.125.5, 00:00:58, Virtual-Access1

4.5 OSPF

Configure an OSPF stub area.  You’re also going to need a virtual-link as this new stub area is not connected to area 0 (or area 0.0.0.0 in this case 🙂 ).

r2(config-router)#area 125 virtual-link 150.1.1.1

r2(config-router)#do sh ip os int br
Interface    PID   Area            IP Address/Mask    Cost  State Nbrs F/C
VL0          100   0               128.1.125.2/24     2     P2P   1/1
Gi0/0        100   12              128.1.27.2/24      1     BDR   1/1
Vi1          100   125             128.1.125.2/24     1     P2MP  1/1
Vt1          100   125             128.1.125.2/24     1     DOWN  0/0

sw1#sh ip route os
     128.1.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 6 subnets, 2 masks
O IA    128.1.136.0/24 [110/4] via 128.1.27.2, 00:00:40, Vlan72
O IA    128.1.63.0/24 [110/11115] via 128.1.27.2, 00:00:40, Vlan72
O IA    128.1.125.5/32 [110/2] via 128.1.27.2, 00:01:08, Vlan72
O IA    128.1.125.1/32 [110/3] via 128.1.27.2, 00:01:08, Vlan72
O IA    128.1.125.2/32 [110/1] via 128.1.27.2, 00:01:08, Vlan72
O*IA 0.0.0.0/0 [110/2] via 128.1.27.2, 00:01:08, Vlan72

Why all of the virtual-links in the IE solution guide?:

Task 4.5

4.6 OSPF

You’re asked to configure area 51 (hehe) between sw1 and bb2.  The problem is that this new area is non connected to area 0 and you cannot use a virtual-link because area 12 is a stub area.

Another tunnel?  Yup.

Steps:
1) Create tunnel through area 12.
2) Enable OSPF on the tunnel interfaces.  Place them in area 0 (0.0.0.0).

I had to ‘ip os mtu-ignore’ on tu0 on r2.

4.7 OSPF Loopback Advertisements

Advertise a bunch of loopbacks into a couple of non-existant areas.  If everything is configured correctly you should see all of the loopbacks on sw1:

sw1(config-router)#do sh ip route os | i 150.1.
     150.1.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 6 subnets, 2 masks
O IA    150.1.6.6/32 [110/11115] via 128.1.72.2, 00:00:09, Tunnel0
O IA    150.1.5.5/32 [110/11113] via 128.1.72.2, 00:00:09, Tunnel0
O IA    150.1.3.3/32 [110/11115] via 128.1.72.2, 00:00:09, Tunnel0
O IA    150.1.2.2/32 [110/11112] via 128.1.72.2, 00:00:09, Tunnel0
O IA    150.1.1.1/32 [110/11114] via 128.1.72.2, 00:00:09, Tunnel0

4.8 RIPv2

A straight-forward, easy task.  Thankfully!  🙂

4.9 Default Routing

Configure r4 to generate a default router to sw2 but not to r5.  Don’t use a distribute-list.

We can add a route-map to the ‘default-information-originate’ under the RIP process:

r4(config-router)#default-information originate ?
  route-map  Route-map reference
  <cr>

default-information originate (RIP)

So how do I write a route-map to only advertise to sw2?

r4(config-router)#do sh ip proto | sec Default version
  Default version control: send version 2, receive version 2
    Interface             Send  Recv  Triggered RIP  Key-chain
    FastEthernet0/1       2     2
    Dialer0               2     2

I want to send the default out fa0/1 and not dialer0 interface.

r4(config-route-map)#set ?
  interface         Output interface

route-map RIP_DEFAULT permit 10
 set interface FastEthernet0/1
!
router rip
 default-information originate route-map RIP_DEFAULT

sw2#sh ip route rip | i 0.0.0.0
R*   0.0.0.0/0
[120/1] via 128.1.48.4, 00:00:06, Vlan48

r5#sh ip route rip | i 0.0.0.0
r5# <-no default route on r5

4.10 Route Filtering

“Configure sw2 so that it will use the default route advertised by r4 to reach the 128.1.14.0/24 network.”
“Use an offset-list on sw2 to accomplish this task.”

This is just a wordy way of telling you to bitbucket the existing route to 128.1.14.0:

Before:
sw2#sh ip route 128.1.14.0
Routing entry for 128.1.14.0/24
  Known via “rip”, distance 120, metric 1
  Redistributing via rip
  Last update from 128.1.48.4 on Vlan48, 00:00:21 ago
  Routing Descriptor Blocks:
  * 128.1.48.4, from 128.1.48.4, 00:00:21 ago, via Vlan48
      Route metric is 1, traffic share count is 1

After:
access-list 71 permit 128.1.14.0 0.0.0.255
!
router rip
  offset-list 71 in 16 vlan48

sw2#sh ip route 128.1.14.0
% Subnet not in table
sw2#p 128.1.14.4
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 128.1.14.4, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/1 ms

4.11 IGP Redistribution

Perform mutual redistribution on three different devices.  As with most of the Volume III labs, you may as well do the next task (the redistribution ‘gotcha’) at the same time.

4.12 Redistribution Loop Prevention

“Ensure that the RIP routes redistributed into EIGRP on r4 do not get passed back into RIP from OSPF on r5.”
“Use route tagging to accomplish this task.”

Sweet.  Route tagging is my preferred method.

So I’m going to tag RIP routes on r4 and then filter those same routes with r5:

r4#sh run | sec route-map RIP->EIGRP
 redistribute rip metric 1 1 1 1 1 route-map RIP->EIGRP
route-map RIP->EIGRP permit 10
 set tag 4120

r5#sh run | sec route-map RIP->OSPF
 redistribute ospf 100 metric 1 route-map RIP->OSPF
route-map RIP->OSPF deny 10
 match tag 4120
route-map RIP->OSPF permit 20

Everything was working fine except for 128.1.14.4 (f0/0 on r1).  I finally had to filter this route from passing to OSPF on r1 and everything was fine.

r1#sh run | sec 128_|EIGRP->OSPF
 redistribute eigrp 10 subnets route-map EIGRP->OSPF
ip prefix-list 128_1_14_0 seq 5 permit 128.1.14.0/24
route-map EIGRP->OSPF deny 10
 match ip address prefix-list 128_1_14_0
route-map EIGRP->OSPF permit 20

This didn’t break the requirements of the task, but I still bothered that I couldn’t figure out why this address was unreachable.

The IE solution guide is a mess for these tasks:

Task 4.13

The task asks you to use route tags to accomplish this task but the IE solution shows r5 changing the AD for OSPF external routes???

r5:
router ospf 1
 distance ospf external 121

 

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2 Comments »

  1. Regarding Task 4.4. OSPF
    • Configure OSPF area 125 on the Frame Relay connection between R1,
    R2, and R5.

    Why did you have to change the network type to Point to Multipoint
    Without this it works just fine

    Comment by Aly — April 28, 2008 @ 11:11 pm | Reply

  2. @Aly – I don’t have this lab up on a rack, but if I remember correctly I used point-to-multipoint to ensure reachablity between the spokes (r2 and r1).

    Comment by cciepursuit — April 29, 2008 @ 6:24 am | Reply


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