CCIE Pursuit Blog

September 3, 2007

Clearing Lines

Filed under: Cisco,Cisco Certification,Home Lab,IOS — cciepursuit @ 11:33 am

File this one under me being a bonehead.  I have my home lab devices connected to two power sources (glorified power strips – not quite UPS’s).  I generally flip the switches on these devices and all of my devices power up at once.  Then I connect my laptop to the console port of the access server (2500) and then make my connections to the devices in the pod.

I always end up battling the “lines”.  I will invariabley have some lines that I’m unable to use unless I clear them first.  Sometimes I have to clear them multiple times before I can connect over them (the connections to the switches seem to be the worst).

Here’s a typical example:

a1#sh line
 Tty Typ     Tx/Rx     A Modem  Roty AccO AccI  Uses    Noise   Overruns
*  0 CTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   1 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
*  2 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   3 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   4 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   5 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   6 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   7 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
*  8 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        2        2/5
*  9 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        1        0/0
* 10 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        1        1/0
* 11 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        1        0/0
* 12 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        1        0/0
  13 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  14 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  15 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  16 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  17 AUX   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  18 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  19 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  20 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  21 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  22 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0

I want to use line 2 to connect to r2:

a1#sh line
 Tty Typ     Tx/Rx     A Modem  Roty AccO AccI  Uses    Noise   Overruns
*  0 CTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   1 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
*  2 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
—–Output Truncated—–

Let’s clear the line:

a1#clear line 2
[confirm]
 [OK]
a1#sh line
 Tty Typ     Tx/Rx     A Modem  Roty AccO AccI  Uses    Noise   Overruns
*  0 CTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   1 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
*  2 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
—–Output Truncated—–

Now let’s make our connections:

a1#connect r1
Trying r1 (10.1.1.1, 2001)… Open

a1#connect r2
Trying r2 (10.1.1.1, 2002)…
% Connection refused by remote host

Curse you line 2!!!!

a1#sh line
 Tty Typ     Tx/Rx     A Modem  Roty AccO AccI  Uses    Noise   Overruns
*  0 CTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
*  1 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
*  2 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
—–Output Truncated—–

Some days it would take me 20 minutes just to get all of my reverse telnet sessions established.

I should have been able to figure out the problem earlier.  At my old job we had a ton of 2500s and 2600s in the field.  Whenever we would power cycle these routers we would have the site contact disconnect the cable from the console port and then reconnect it once the router came back up.  The console cable was connected to a small modem that we used for out-of-band management.  If we left that connection in the console port of the router, either the router would mess up it’s POST (this rarely happened) or the modem would become inaccessible (this happened a lot).  I’m not sure exactly what the caused this issue, but I should have been able to relate that experience to my own.

I did eventually decide to fire up all of the routers and switches before powering up the access router.  Or if I forgot to do that, I could just reload the access router.  That made all the difference in the world.

Et voila!  All my connections are availble:

After reload:
a1#sh line
 Tty Typ     Tx/Rx     A Modem  Roty AccO AccI  Uses    Noise   Overruns
*  0 CTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   1 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   2 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        1        0/0
   3 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   4 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   5 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   6 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   7 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
   8 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        1        0/0
   9 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  10 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  11 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        1        0/0
  12 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        1        0/0
  13 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  14 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  15 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  16 TTY   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  17 AUX   9600/9600   –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  18 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  19 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  20 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  21 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0
  22 VTY               –    –      –    –    –     0        0        0/0

No more battling the lines to establish my connections.  That save me time so that I can use it later when I screw something else up.  🙂

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. Hi There

    I know this is a little late (have just discovered your site) and it is also something you already know, but in my own home lab (CCNP Student) when I have the problem you describe, I just do a “disconnect 2” which tears down the connection and then I reconnect and once again I have access to my equipment.

    Best Regards,

    Michael

    P.S. This is an excellent site, thanks for making it available to the masses 🙂

    Comment by Michael Keeley — November 1, 2007 @ 5:10 am | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: