CCIE Pursuit Blog

May 28, 2008

Internetwork Expert Graded Mock Lab 5: First Impressions

Filed under: Cisco,Cisco Certification,Mock Labs,Status Updates — cciepursuit @ 10:22 pm

Wow.  I feel completely dead.  I finished Mock Lab 5 and felt like I had just gone 15 rounds with Mike Tyson (circa 1988).  I knew that I did not get 80 points, but I was feeling pretty good about breaking 60.  I just went through the solution guide, and I will be lucky to break 40 points.  Between points left on the board and simple mistakes, I probably lost 40 points.  There were a lot of tasks that I had the right idea, but missed a single line of configuration. 

For the second mock lab in a row, I fucked myself over by spending way too much time on some optional (non core) tasks.  Right out of the gate I tripped all over myself on this one.  I WAY over-thought (and under-thought?) a dot1q tunneling task.  I lost about 40 minutes and had to rip out all of my configuration and reload the switches.  I eventually caught back up on time.  I completed IGP redistribution with 3.5 hours left.   Since BGP was already built, I should have been able to finish the lab with some time to spare.  It was not to be.  I spent another 30 minutes trying to match a BGP debug output.  I should have just moved on, but I kept thinking “Oh, this HAS to be it”.  I CANNOT allow myself to do crap like that.  I have this stupid personality trait where I’ll spend time on something if I think that “I’m just about to get it”.  In real life that type of persistence may pay off, in the lab it’s just a long, dark rabbit hole to failure.  Needless to say, I missed out on the points anyways.  I could have used that time researching ‘service nagle’.  :-)

I always seem to lose it around the 6 hour mark.  I have no idea why that is.  I start getting punch drunk and making stupid mistakes.  I lost points on a QoS task because I configured Bc using AR instead of CIR.  ARRGH!!!!! 

I’m pretty sure that I nailed IGP redistribution and I spent less time on it than normal (still too much time).  I missed some easy BGP points because I forgot to add a “permit the rest” type of statement at the end of my route-map.  I left another easy BGP task on the board because I didn’t have time to come back to it (yet I found 30 minutes to dick around with debug output).  I need to commit to memory who authenticates whom in PAP and CHAP. 

I’m not ready for the lab, that’s for sure.  I’m thinking that I will keep my October date.  I have really had a shitty time over the last 1.5 months.  Family and work are gnawing into my already limited study time.  I feel like I’ve plateaued in my progress.  My first mock lab score was an 89.  The next two were in the mid-fifties.  This one may well fall into the forties.  Granted, the tests are progressively more difficult, but I’m still flailing.

IE opened up beta testing on version 5 of their Volume I lab book (just the Bridging and Switching section so far).  I’m going to run through that this weekend and then start repeating some of the Volume III and II labs before heading out to Reno for the Mock Lab Workshop.  I can’t believe that it’s nearly June already.

I need to really spend some time on my weaknesses: BGP (I’m slowly getting better), Multicast, Security (I am miserable at this section – at least with Multicast I can fake the funk).  There are still some minor technologies that I’m not “aces” at: dot1q tunneling, PPP authentication, OSPF route filtering, and private VLANs.  Maybe one more pass through the Volume I labs will sort some of this out.

Oh well….off to bed.  Tomorrow I get to go back to work to try to catch up on 5 days of backlog (counting the holiday and the weekend).  I can’t believe that I’m taking vacation days just to get my teeth kicked in on these mock labs. 

OT: The 10 Most Annoying Programs on the Internet

Filed under: OT: Humor,Status Updates — cciepursuit @ 9:46 am
Tags:

I’ve been getting killed by work and studies lately.  I’m about 20 minutes away from failing yet another Mock Lab today.  Blogging will return (hopefully) tomorrow.  In the mean time, TechRepublic has a list of the 10 Most Annoying Programs on the Internet.  I agree with the entire list with the possible exception of Flash.  Without Flash, we would not be treated to the brilliance that is zombo.com or the Badger Song (both are best ‘enjoyed’ with copious doses of your favorite flavor of narcotic).  ;-)

May 26, 2008

Question Of The Day: 26 May, 2008

Filed under: Cisco — cciepursuit @ 9:45 am
Tags: , , , , ,

Topic: Multicast

r1 is a multicast router.  It receives a packet with the destination address of 224.255.1.10.  What will it do with this packet?


Yesterday’s Question

Question Of The Day: 23 May, 2008 

Topic: Multicast

What is the MAC Address of 242.9.169.28?

Answer: 01:00:5e:09:a9:1c

Let’s start by converting the multicast IP address to binary:

242     11110010
9         00001001
169     10101001
28       00011100

So we have:

11110010 00001001 10101001 00011100

Multicast addresses use a base MAC Address of 01:00:5e:xx:xx:xx with the 25th bit always set to 0:

00000001 00000000 01011110 000000000 00000000 00000000

To form the Multicast MAC Address we just need to take the 23 lower order bits of the multicast IP address and replace the 23 lower order bits in the base multicast MAC address:

11110010 00001001 10101001 00011100

00000001 00000000 01011110 00000000 00000000 00000000

00000001 00000000 01011110 00001001 10101001 00011100

Converting that back to hexadecimal, we get our answer:

01:00:5e:09:a9:1c

May 24, 2008

Some Of This Crap Really Has Real World Implications :-)

Filed under: BGP,Cisco,Cisco Certification,IOS,Work — cciepursuit @ 3:39 pm
Tags: , , ,

I had an issue at work with a DS3 mysteriously bouncing.  We never saw the circuit actually drop (nor any errors) but the BGP peering would sporadically drop.  After one of the engineers “solved” the problem by having AT&T set their BGP timers to match ours (see this QoD for an explanation of why that did not work) the issue came to me.  I suggested that we disable bgp fast-external-fallover and see if that at least kept the peering nailed up.  That worked!  We later found out that the site had taken a lightning strike a couple of weeks ago.  We had a vendor meet with Cisco, AT&T, the cabling vendor, and the LEC the next day.  MAGICALLY the issue “cleared while testing” once the LEC looked at the circuit.  :-)

Anyhoo…by default bgp fast-external-fallover is enabled.  This is generally a good thing as it will bring down a BGP peering if a directly connected link goes down.  No need to wait out your 3 keepalives.  In our case, their was some sporadic issue that “blinked” out the circuit (I suspect a punch-drunk repeater or some CO equipment) very briefly.  Our router would then bring down the BGP peering and then re-establish it.  By configuring ‘no bgp fast-external-fallover’ under the BGP process, we were able to keep the BGP peering up.

bgp fast-external-fallover

Usage Guidelines
The bgp fast-external-fallover command is used to disable or enable fast external fallover for BGP peering sessions with directly connected external peers. The session is immediately reset if link goes down. Only directly connected peering sessions are supported.

If BGP fast external fallover is disabled, the BGP routing process will wait until the default hold timer expires (3 keepalives) to reset the peering session. BGP fast external fallover can also be configured on a per-interface basis using the ip bgp fast-external-fallover interface configuration command.

May 23, 2008

Question Of The Day: 23 May, 2008

Topic: Multicast

What is the MAC Address of 242.9.169.28?

Click Here For The Answer


Yesterday’s Question

Question Of The Day: 22 May, 2008 

Topic: Multicast

Which well-known multicast groups do each of the following addresses below to:

224.0.0.1
224.0.0.2 
224.0.0.5
224.0.0.6 
224.0.0.9 
224.0.0.10   
224.0.1.39 
224.0.1.40 

Answer:
224.0.0.1  All systems on this subnet 
224.0.0.2  All routers on this subnet   
224.0.0.5  All OSPF routers 
224.0.0.6  OSPF designated routers 
224.0.0.9  RIP-2 routers 
224.0.0.10  EIGRP routers   
224.0.1.39  Cisco-RP-Announce 
224.0.1.40  Cisco-RP-Discovery

May 22, 2008

Lab Tip: Cisco Proprietary versus Open Standard EtherChannel Protocol

Filed under: Cisco,Cisco Certification,IOS,Switching — cciepursuit @ 2:15 pm
Tags: , , ,

I’ve run across this type of question a couple of times in labs:

Configure interfaces fa0/19 – 21 into an EtherChannel using an open standards protocol.

-or-

Configure interfaces fa0/19 – 21 into an EtherChannel using a Cisco proprietary protocol.

This always throws me for some reason.  I know that the two EtherChannel protocols are PaGP and LACP, but I can never remember (probably because I never thought that it would be important) which protocol is Cisco proprietary and which is open standards.  I tried looking this up in the DOC CD one time, but did not see it mentioned.  I eventually just hit Wikipedia to get the answer, but I’m pretty sure that will not be available in the lab.

I’ve developed a simple (and most likely stupid) method of remembering this:

PaGP starts with P which is the letter  that ‘proprietary’ starts with.

It’s kind of lame, but it gets the job done for me so I thought that I would share.

 

 

 

Question Of The Day: 22 May, 2008

Topic: Mulitcast

Which well-known multicast groups do each of the following addresses below to:

224.0.0.1
224.0.0.2 
224.0.0.5
224.0.0.6 
224.0.0.9 
224.0.0.10   
224.0.1.39 
224.0.1.40 

Click Here For The Answer


Yesterday’s Question

Question Of The Day: 20 May, 2008 

Topic: OSPF

You’ve rolled out your new OSPF auto-cost command to your network.  It looks like one of your colleagues has adjusted the OSPF cost of interface FastEthernet0/0.  That interface should have an OSPF cost of 1000.  What will it’s OSPF cost be based on the following configuration:

interface FastEthernet0/0
 description ->r2 fa0/0
 ip address 100.1.12.1 255.255.255.0
 ip ospf cost 10
 !
router ospf 100
 router-id 1.1.1.1
 auto-cost reference-bandwidth 100000
 network 100.1.12.1 0.0.0.0 area 0
 network 100.1.12.1 0.0.0.0 area 0

Answer: The OSPF cost will be 10.

The OSPF cost interface command will override the default cost of an interface.  Even though we’ve changed the way that IOS calculates the default cost (by using the auto-cost command under the OSPF process) it is still the default cost.

 

May 21, 2008

Participate in the Design of Cisco Certifications????

Filed under: Cisco,Cisco Certification — cciepursuit @ 7:05 am
Tags: , , ,

I received an email last week from something called learningsupport_fdbk@rnmk.com.  It is for an enticing offer to:

Participate in the Development of Cisco Career Certifications
In order to maintain the relevance and quality of our certification exams, Cisco routinely asks external Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) to participate in job task analysis, domain identification and exam development.  SMEs are crucial to the process and help ensure Cisco Career Certifications remain among the most highly regarded in the industry. This is a legitimate offer from Cisco for you to participate in this unique opportunity.

I’m not sure what I’m supposed to be an SME in?  I assume that this email was sent to all (or a certain subset) of Cisco certified folks.  You send in a resume and hope you get picked.

Networking Engineer Job Task Analysis Workshop
June 16-20, in Boxborough, Massachusetts (outside Boston)
SEEKING:  Engineers who plan, design, implement, operate, monitor and troubleshoot multi-site, multi-protocol, multi-service (data, voice, video, wireless) networks
Must work in environment featuring large number of networking devices
Job role can be IT staff, field, or managerial
Experience in specifying tasks that others accomplish

SMEs will be asked to:
Attend a five-day job task analysis workshop at a Cisco office in Boxborough, Mass. (outside of Boston).  For those from out of the area, air travel and lodging to attend the workshop will be reimbursed up to $4000 USD.
Participate with SME peers and Cisco staff in writing and reviewing documentation pertaining to the domain skills required of Cisco Certified Internetwork Experts (CCIE)s in Routing and Switching.  SMEs need to be able to work independently and in small groups.  SMEs must have strong writing skills and should be able to articulate thoughts in writing and verbally.

Ummmm…..BOXBOROUGH???  I thought for sure that this was some spammer screwing up (twice) the spelling of Foxborough, but it turns out that there is actually a small town about 30 miles outside of Boston called Boxborough.  So maybe it is legit?  If so, it sounds pretty sweet.  They will pay you for your travel and your time – most likely less than a week of work, but if you have vacation to burn it’s worth it.  You also get free snacks :-) and a voucher for a Cisco exam (not the lab though).  If you were already planning a trip to Boxborough then this is your Golden Ticket!  :)

SMEs will receive (pending full level of participation):
All information and materials required to complete the given tasks.
Continental breakfast, lunch, snacks and beverages during meeting days.  Dietary restrictions will be accommodated.
Recognition for you and your organization (if provided) on Cisco certification community sites.
A stipend of $300 USD per day.
A voucher (coupon) to take one Cisco certification exam at any Pearson VUE testing facility, free of charge.  (Offer excludes lab exams taken at Cisco facilities.).
Priority placement (if desired) in beta test of new CCNP level training course, free of charge.
A certificate of participation.
A Cisco logo golf shirt.

SME Requirements:
Two years networking experience and CCNP certified.
Strong communication and English skills.
Commitment to participate fully for five 8-hour days.
Non-disclosure agreement (NDA) signed prior to participation.  
Ability to independently obtain visa and any necessary authorization for travel.
Submit an updated resume that highlights your experience in:

Troubleshooting tier 2+ networking issues and resolving escalations
Configuring security solutions or “hardening” the network
Identification and mitigation of network performance issues
NOTE: SMEs outside the U.S. are encouraged to apply if a visa can be obtained.

I’ll be in Reno attending the IE Mocklab Workshop during that time, so I won’t be able to attend – even though I think that it was pretty unlikely that I would be chosen.  :-)

May 20, 2008

CCIE Candidate.com: Keith Tokash Is The New Dread Pirate Roberts

Filed under: Cisco — cciepursuit @ 8:22 am

Ethan Banks recently ascended into the ranks of the numbered, but his blog still lives on.  Keith “Genghis” Tokash has begun posting his quest for the CCIE.  He’s from LA and works for MySpace.  He seems to be a good guy although he did once dis Fremont (I’ll try not to hold a grudge :-)  ).  You can check out his posts here.

He has attended both the Micronics (Nabrik) and Unitek CCIE bootcamps.  He has posted a very good review of the Unitek bootcamp (as well as some comparisons to Narbik’s camp) here.

Good luck to Keith (it sounds like he’s close to the end of his journey) and be sure to check out his posts.

Question Of The Day: 20 May, 2008

Topic: OSPF

You’ve rolled out your new OSPF auto-cost command to your network.  It looks like one of your colleagues has adjusted the OSPF cost of interface FastEthernet0/0.  That interface should have an OSPF cost of 1000.  What will it’s OSPF cost be based on the following configuration:

interface FastEthernet0/0
 description ->r2 fa0/0
 ip address 100.1.12.1 255.255.255.0
 ip ospf cost 10
 !
router ospf 100
 router-id 1.1.1.1
 auto-cost reference-bandwidth 100000
 network 100.1.12.1 0.0.0.0 area 0
 network 100.1.12.1 0.0.0.0 area 0

Click Here For The Answer


Yesterday’s Question

Question Of The Day: 19 May, 2008 

You’ve rolled out your new OSPF auto-cost command to your network.  It looks like you’ve missed a router.  r1 is peered with r2 over an Ethernet connection.  r1 has been updated with the new reference bandwidth, but r2 has not.

r1
router ospf 100
 auto-cost reference-bandwidth 100000
 network 10.1.12.1 0.0.0.0 area 0
!
interface FastEthenet 0/0
 ip address 10.1.12.1 255.255.255.0

r2
router ospf 100
 network 10.1.12.2 0.0.0.0 area 0
!
interface FastEthenet 0/0
 ip address 10.1.12.2 255.255.255.0

Will these routers form an OSPF neighbor adjacency?

Answer: Yes, the routers will form an OSPF adjacency.

r1 is peered with r2:

r1(config)#do show ip ospf neighbor

Neighbor ID     Pri   State           Dead Time   Address         Interface
2.2.2.2           0   FULL/  –        00:00:37    10.1.12.2       FastEthernet0/0

r1(config-router)#do show ip ospf neighbor detail | i interface|State|is up
 Neighbor 2.2.2.2, interface address 10.1.12.2
    In the area 0 via interface FastEthernet0/0
    Neighbor priority is 0, State is FULL, 6 state changes
    Neighbor is up for 00:11:42

Now let’s change the bandwidth-reference on r1:

r1(config)#router ospf 100
r1(config-router)#auto-cost reference-bandwidth 100000
% OSPF: Reference bandwidth is changed.
        Please ensure reference bandwidth is consistent across all routers.

The peering does not drop:

r1(config)#do show ip ospf neighbor

Neighbor ID     Pri   State           Dead Time   Address         Interface
2.2.2.2           0   FULL/  –        00:00:35    10.1.12.2       FastEthernet0/0

r1(config)#do show ip ospf neighbor detail | i interface|State|is up
 Neighbor 2.2.2.2, interface address 10.1.12.2
    In the area 0 via interface FastEthernet0/0
    Neighbor priority is 0, State is FULL, 6 state changes
    Neighbor is up for 00:14:38

I guess that this should not come as a surprise as reference-bandwidth is not one of the required attributes to establish an OSPF neighbor adjacency.

r1#show ip ospf interface brief
Interface    PID   Area            IP Address/Mask    Cost  State Nbrs F/C
Se1/0        100   0               10.1.12.1/24       1000 P2P   1/1

r2#show ip ospf interface brief
Interface    PID   Area            IP Address/Mask    Cost  State Nbrs F/C
Fa0/0        100   0               10.1.12.2/24       1    P2P   1/1

 

 

 

Next Page »

The Rubric Theme. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 112 other followers